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Currently, we offer the following courses.


Using Biblical Languages I: Hebrew and Aramaic
The Christian Bible was written in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. Knowing these languages sufficiently to come to reliable exegetical insights typically requires years of study. Most people simply do not have that time. This course focuses on “using the biblical languages” rather than “learning them.” In a span of 10 hours theory and 10 hours practice, we aim to learn the basics of the language(s) and how to use the language(s) for understanding the Bible more deeply by looking at the original language(s).

If you are interested in participating in this course, please sign up. For more information, click here.


Using Biblical Languages II: Greek

See the description for “Using Biblical Languages I: Hebrew and Aramaic.”

If you are interested in participating in this course, please sign up. For more information, click here.


Select Theological Topics from a Hebraic Perspective
This course discusses various theological topics from a so-called Hebraic perspective. This perspective* in this context simply means that topics are viewed from both the Hebrew Bible and New Testament. Occasionally, an appeal will also be made to traditions in early Judaism and Christianity.
Main positions concerning theological topics will often be outlined. This enables students to appreciate the various viewpoints. This helps to create tolerance, yet also allows one to critically evaluate the available evidence and reach one’s own conclusions.
Last, but not least, for each hour of theory, there will be an hour of discussion about the possible practical implications of the discussed theory. In this hour, the instructor will become more of a fasciliator, rather than a lecturer. The class as a whole will engage with the topics. This will help the student to check their familiarity with the topic as well as challenging their abilities to take the theory a step futher towards practice.

If you are interested in participating in this course, please sign up. For more information, click here.


Faculty
All courses are taught by our well qualified faculty.


*) The term Hebraic perspective is not trying to lay claims to certain currents in Christianity or Judaism.

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